some projects from first year of master’s program

http://yuristone.com

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Interview with ASL interpreters Shelly Liuzza and Josh Garrett, 2014

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New Yorker Issue March 17, 2014

New Yorker Issue March 17, 2014

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renaissancesociety:

Anna Gray & Ryan Wilson Paulsen, offset edition from the series 18x24, 2013.  Exhibition poster for upcoming group show Teen Paranormal Romance opening this Sunday, March 9 and running through April 13.  RSVP for the opening reception and artist talk via Facebook.  

renaissancesociety:

Anna Gray & Ryan Wilson Paulsen, offset edition from the series 18x24, 2013.  Exhibition poster for upcoming group show Teen Paranormal Romance opening this Sunday, March 9 and running through April 13.  RSVP for the opening reception and artist talk via Facebook.  

This was posted 5 months ago. It has 71 notes. .
renaissancesociety:

Dugnad Video NightFriday, August 9, 7-10pmThe Renaissance Society, 5811 S Ellis Ave, ChicagoDugnad:
Norwegian, from Old Norse dugnaðr (“help”)
Idiomatically, the collective cleaning of communal space, a social-democratic ideal
Solveig Øvstebø’s inaugural act as Executive Director of the Renaissance Society
Taking over the entirety of Cobb Hall’s 4th floor, Dugnad Video Night will showcase an idiosyncratic video archive solely the product of random, unfettered accumulation. Come and go as you please, while we screen orphaned media beyond the reach of YouTube.

renaissancesociety:

Dugnad Video Night
Friday, August 9, 7-10pm
The Renaissance Society, 5811 S Ellis Ave, Chicago


Dugnad:

  • Norwegian, from Old Norse dugnaðr (“help”)
  • Idiomatically, the collective cleaning of communal space, a social-democratic ideal
  • Solveig Øvstebø’s inaugural act as Executive Director of the Renaissance Society

Taking over the entirety of Cobb Hall’s 4th floor, Dugnad Video Night will showcase an idiosyncratic video archive solely the product of random, unfettered accumulation. Come and go as you please, while we screen orphaned media beyond the reach of YouTube.

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Columbia, Maryland

Columbia, Maryland

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A exhibition I curated is opening next weekend in Chicago at Monument 2.  New Fiber is an exhibition featuring four artists that work in the fiber and textile arts, all of which recognize the history and cultural significance behind their medium.  After studying the new media/digital arts and working at two different galleries that show a lot of new media work, I wanted to get away from what I was comfortable and familiar with and pursue something very different - arguably the opposite of digital work: craft work.  I delved into the history of the textile, the “Craft Movement” of the 60s, and what is today considered “contemporary fiber arts.” 


I really like the dichotomy of the textile.  Functioning as both decorative as well as practical objects, textiles are incorporated into every aspect of our lives.  And I really like the idea of taking something as commonplace as a blanket or rug (which, in these modern times, was made in a factory, very quickly, with very little handwork) and looking it at as an “art object” or as a catalyst to create artwork.  I noticed a distinct difference between the popular contemporary fiber artists of the 60s and 70s and today’s generation of art school students and recent graduates working in the fiber and textile arts - and so did Louise Mazanti:


"[There is a]…conceptual tendency that emerged from the middle of the 90s, first and  foremost characterized by a radical breach with the traditional, formal  aesthetics of craft in favour of a more ‘external’ agenda. In this new,  conceptual craft society is addressed, questioned, commented upon and  gently mocked by objects that possess reflective layers of meaning." [Super-Objects: A Theory of Contemporary, Conceptual Craft, Louise Mazanti, 2006]


There is a level of self-awareness that all of the work in New Fiber consider.  While many fiber artists in the 1970s focused on the relationship between the individual and gender, race, and social status expressed through fiber work, the work in New Fiber goes beyond these very specific social and political constructs and looks, on a conceptual level, at the material itself and its relationship to our culture on a larger scale. 


The official press release can be found on my website.

A exhibition I curated is opening next weekend in Chicago at Monument 2New Fiber is an exhibition featuring four artists that work in the fiber and textile arts, all of which recognize the history and cultural significance behind their medium.  After studying the new media/digital arts and working at two different galleries that show a lot of new media work, I wanted to get away from what I was comfortable and familiar with and pursue something very different - arguably the opposite of digital work: craft work.  I delved into the history of the textile, the “Craft Movement” of the 60s, and what is today considered “contemporary fiber arts.” 

I really like the dichotomy of the textile.  Functioning as both decorative as well as practical objects, textiles are incorporated into every aspect of our lives.  And I really like the idea of taking something as commonplace as a blanket or rug (which, in these modern times, was made in a factory, very quickly, with very little handwork) and looking it at as an “art object” or as a catalyst to create artwork.  I noticed a distinct difference between the popular contemporary fiber artists of the 60s and 70s and today’s generation of art school students and recent graduates working in the fiber and textile arts - and so did Louise Mazanti:

"[There is a]…conceptual tendency that emerged from the middle of the 90s, first and foremost characterized by a radical breach with the traditional, formal aesthetics of craft in favour of a more ‘external’ agenda. In this new, conceptual craft society is addressed, questioned, commented upon and gently mocked by objects that possess reflective layers of meaning." [Super-Objects: A Theory of Contemporary, Conceptual Craft, Louise Mazanti, 2006]

There is a level of self-awareness that all of the work in New Fiber consider.  While many fiber artists in the 1970s focused on the relationship between the individual and gender, race, and social status expressed through fiber work, the work in New Fiber goes beyond these very specific social and political constructs and looks, on a conceptual level, at the material itself and its relationship to our culture on a larger scale. 

The official press release can be found on my website.

This was posted 3 years ago. It has 3 notes. .

Identity Element: works from the new Axiom group

I have a piece in an opening tonight at the Axiom Center for New and Experimental Art.  I worked at Axiom while living in Boston and although I am no longer in the area, I am acting as a remote member of the New Axiom Group.  This is an exhibition that showcases the work for the group of individuals that will be running Axiom for the 2011-2012 season. 

What///  Identity Element: Works from the new Axiom Group
 
Who///  Nicholas DiStefano, 
Meghann Hickson, Heidi Kayser, Georgina Lewis, Wayne Madsen, Nick Marmor and Tyler Gutierrez, Alexander Reben, Allison Rodriguez, Sarah Rushford, Evan Smith, and Yuri Stone

When/// 
Opening Reception: Friday, January 14th, 6-9 pm
              
Exhibition:
January 14th, - February 10th, 2011

Gallery Hours/// Wednesdays 6-9 pm, Thursdays 6-9 pm, Saturdays 2-5 pm,  
                          alternative visiting hours can be arranged by appointment 

Cost/// FREE and Open to the Public

Where/// AXIOM Center for New and Experimental Media - 141 Green Street 
              located in the Green Street T Station on the Orange Line 
  
Information///
For more information, please call 617-676-5904or visit www.axiomart.org

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